Learning From Our Peers – With a Side of Bacon

In this session of Learning From Our Peers we’re going to examine a game zone that’s available to other strategy card games but hasn’t been feasible for Redemption – the sideboard.

“A sideboard or side deck is a set of cards in a collectible card game that are separate from a player’s primary deck. It is used to customize a strategy against an opponent by enabling a player to change the composition of the playing deck.”

Games that use the sideboard tend to play a match, allowing players to modify their deck after the first game. Throughout the years there have been many discussions on the message boards about how we could implement a sideboard into Redemption. It’s a difficult thing to do without playing a match so none of the ideas were ever agreed upon.

Learning From Our Peers – The Bad Beat

It was round 4 of T2 2P at the 2015 National Tournament. Having lost a time-out game to my brother Jordan in round 2, I assumed I probably needed to win the rest of my games to have any shot at taking first. I was matched up against Clift C. who has been (and continues to be) one of the top T2 players in the game. I had jumped out to a 3-1 lead, but LS drought was stopping me from continuing to press the attack. Having looked at Clift’s hand, I knew that he had a bunch of evil enhancements, and his only two evil characters (Assyrian Siege Army and Assyrian Survivor) were both sitting in his territory. Knowing that either of them could do a lot of damage later on, I decided I would use my Jephthah even though it would only be for a battle challenge. I exchanged AutO to Jephthah out of deck, and Clift gave my deck a couple shuffles. He was about to shuffle one more time, but then stopped and said “Ooo, that felt good right there.”

Learning From Our Peers – Tilt

How many of you have ever played a game of pinball? Not a digital rendition on a mobile device or gaming console, but on a real arcade-style pinball table? For those that have, maybe you remember nudging the table to help move the ball the direction you wanted. But if you nudge too much, the table would lock up with a warning – TILT! You’d lose your ball and sometimes points.

The term tilt has also been adapted into strategy card games as slang for those times when our emotions override sound judgment and cause us to make a poor play or adapt a sub-optimal strategy.

Learning From Our Peers – Iconic

Communication and language can be a difficult thing to get right. If you’ve been playing Redemption for very long I’m sure you’ve noticed the progression of card wording over the years as the game’s creators have attempted to have cleaner wording.

Today we’re going to take a look at something that a lot of games have implemented that can help with clean wording and clear communication. Whether it’s a CCG, a board game, or something else that uses cards as one of it’s tools, most modern games make use of symbols in the card text.

Learning From Our Peers – The King of Beatdown

Many years ago when I played MTG a favorite quote from one of my favorite players went something like this “There are no wrong threats, only wrong answers”. The quote comes from a guy named David Price who was given titles such as “The People’s Champion” and “The King of Beatdown”. But what does it mean?

Learning From Our Peers – Counting the Cost

If you’re familiar with other CCGs then you’re aware that most use some kind of cost system as a way to build up resources as the game progresses and to balance the power level of cards. Some use energy, mana, or coins as a means of paying a cost to play your cards. One of the things I liked about Redemption when I was first introduced is that you could just play your cards. The game doesn’t have a cost system. Or does it?

Learning From Our Peers – I Am Second

I am second. If you haven’t heard of this before, it’s a really cool movement meant to inspire people to live for God and others. They’ve put together powerful video testimonies of lives transformed by the Gospel, including people from pop culture. While I find these testimonies of God’s awesomeness inspiring, that’s not the focus of our discussion today. We’re going to venture back into the deep end of the pool to talk about why it’s good to go second in a two-player game of Redemption.

Learning From Our Peers – Know Your Role: Part 3

In preparation for the State, Regional and National tournament season this summer, we’re going to jump head first into some deep waters. We’re going far beyond the basics to talk about the subtle differences that separate an average player from an elite player. Understanding and applying these principles will greatly improve your game. If playing competitively is your thing, take a deep breath and jump in with me…

Learning From Our Peers – Know Your Role: Part 2

In preparation for the State, Regional and National tournament season this summer, we’re going to jump head first into some deep waters. We’re going far beyond the basics to talk about the subtle differences that separate an average player from an elite player. Understanding and applying these principles will greatly improve your game. If playing competitively is your thing, take a deep breath and jump in with me…

Learning From Our Peers – Know Your Role: Part 1

In preparation for the State, Regional and National tournament season this summer, we’re going to jump head-first into some deep waters. We’re going far beyond the basics to talk about the subtle differences that separate an average player from an elite player. Understanding and applying these principles will greatly improve your game. If playing competitively is your thing, take a deep breath and jump in with me…

Learning From Our Peers – Push Button, Receive Bacon

Redemption offers are large pool of cards and a nearly infinite possibility of decks. With all the different brigades, themes and quality cards printed over the years there should be a large variety in the decks people play. But what happens when a card is so good that most people feel the need to use it to keep a competitive edge? What happens when a card makes things too easy? It’s like “push button, receive bacon”; you get all the goodness without all the work.

Learning From Our Peers – Mulligans

Redemption is different than most other collectible card games (CCGs) in a number of ways. Some of the game mechanics differ and the end goal, rescuing a set number of Lost Souls, is something unique to Redemption. While some aspects are different, it also has a lot in common with other CCGs and deck building games. In “Learn from Our Peers” articles, we will take a specific game aspect or mechanic to see how other games handle a similar situation. We might find that some do things well and some do them poorly. We can learn from both and apply what we learn to the game we love when appropriate.